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't want to tip them off. we need to let this go. the fiscal cliff and jobs are far more important. >> and let's talk about the fiscal cliff and jobs. in your time in california you worked on in the state assembly, a state hit hard by a fiscal y crisis. >> i sure did. >> i want to talk to you about something you said in terms of medicare reform and medicaid. obviously republicans are saying, look, in exchange for any type of taxes going up, we want to see some real entitlement reform. you talk about cracking down on waste, fraud and abuse. is there enough revenue from waste, fraud and abuse and m medicare to get the type of serious deficit reform needed to bring down the $16 trillion debt? >> well, you know, i think anytime you're talking about a deficit, there's two ways to bring it down, and i know you know this well. you're either going to raise revenue or have cuts, and i would continue to argue for a balanced approach which means i do think you can find savings in both programs. but what i'm concerned about is what the real agenda is and the real agenda, in my opinion, is to
." >>> president obama ramps up the sales pitch on his fiscal cliff picks. will public pressure push republicans into a deal. one leading house republican who happens to be a former pollster takes a very vocal position on what he thinks his party needs to do and to do now. >>> u.n. ambassador susan rice's attempt to smooth things over doesn't go over as well as she or the white house would have liked. guess who stepped out to vouch for her. none other than a retiring amigo, senator joe lieberman. >>> and new numbers on a hypothetical matchup for 2013 that would be sure to get some votes. what would happen if cory booker took on chris christie. that's not the only big 2013 news this morning on the campaign front. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, november 28, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. right to my first read of the morning. so is washington just running out the clock until about ten days before christmas when everyone smells the jet fuel and gets ready to cut a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff? some days it feels that way. the president is stepping up h
to washington this week and with just 36 days left to avert the so-called fiscal cliff becoming more apparent that senate republicans want a deal and they would like one pretty quick. but while there may be a bi-p t bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxes ride. chambliss spoke to his hometown station. >> that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's valid now, but times have changed significantly. and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. >> on sunday south carolina senator lindsey graham also broke ranks saying the norquist pledge can no longer be a conservative litmus test. >> when you're $16 trillion in it debt,
to break. so goes the story that is the fiscal cliff. the president is stepping up his outside game with events this week to 0 build public support. some call it posturing for his preferred combination of tax ineeses and spending cuts. a contrast from how the white house conducted itself during the 2011 debt ceiling standoff. ultimately this fight comes down to another number, 218. the number of house votes needed for a deal. and it's not clear that his efforts will persuade 100 to 120 house republicans who are needed at a minimum for boehner to get a deal done to get to the 218 overall. remember these republicans believe just as fervently as the white house does that they have their version of public opinion on their side. why can do we think this? when it comes to their own voter, both sides are right. the president won re-election fairly handily, but so did republican incumbents in the house. these are some stunning statistics that gerrymandering has created. 93% of the 205 house republicans who ran for re-election won. 88% of them won with 55% of the vote or more. the president
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4